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Postdoctoral Affiliates

CPC Frank H.T. Rhodes Postdoctoral Fellows

The CPC is honored to receive Atlantic Philanthropies' generous endowment to fund post-doctoral fellows in honor of former Cornell president, Frank H. T. Rhodes. The Frank H. T. Rhodes Fellowships stand as a testament to the profound difference Frank Rhodes has made at Cornell by furthering scholarship and research in areas related to poverty alleviation, support for the elderly and disadvantaged children and youth, public health, and human rights. The postdoctoral program is designed to provide support through collaborations with faculty and to assist new scholars in launching their own programs of research. Postdoctoral Associates devote most of their time to independent research, but are expected to be actively involved in CPC activities and events.

Current and Recent CPC Postdoctoral Fellows

  • Patrick Ishizuka (2016-2018)
    Ph.D., Sociology and Social Policy, Princeton University, 2016
    Research interests: causes and consequences of socioeconomic and gender inequalities in the family and labor market.

  • Patrick Ishizuka recently presented his research titled, the Motherhood Penalty in Context: Assessing Discrimination in Low- and High-Skilled Occupations. Using quantitative and experimental methods, his research investigates the causes of socioeconomic and gender inequalities in family life, and how gender inequalities in families reproduce inequalities at work.

    Patrick earned his Ph.D. in Sociology and Social Policy, with a specialization in demography, from Princeton University in 2016. Broadly, his research focuses on work, family, and social inequality. Patrick is in his second year and will continue to work on projects in collaboration with Kelly Musick while in residence.

  • April Sutton, Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of California, San Diego
    Frank H.T. Rhodes Postdoctoral Fellow (2015-2017), Ph.D., Sociology, The University of Texas at Austin, 2015
    Research interests: social stratification; education; gender; spatial inequalities; life course transitions.
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